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RPM

Revenue Performance Management As A Business Growth Strategy

September 20, 2012 • Finance & Economics, STRATEGY & MANAGEMENT

By Phil Fernandez

For more than a decade, I have had a mantra that has guided my personal approach to leadership. It goes like this: Think Big. Start Small. Move Quickly.

I can’t think of a better place to apply this mantra than to the Revenue Performance Management (RPM) journey. RPM is a strategy that optimizes interactions with buyers across the revenue cycle to accelerate predictable revenue growth. It’s a transformative process that aligns and unites marketing and sales, instead of allowing silos and dysfunction to get in the way of bottom line growth. In order to achieve this kind of transformation, companies must address organization, compensation and incentives, job roles, and work practices as well as their technology infrastructure.

This may seem overwhelming initially, but implementing RPM can pay for itself very quickly, because there is so much waste and inefficiency in most marketing and sales groups. There’s plenty of low hanging fruit in most companies to go after in the early days, and having quick successes is valuable because it reinforces organizational commitment and confidence. But, implementing a RPM strategy is a journey. It is a long-term commitment to systematic business transformation—one that touches processes, organization structures, information technologies, and metrics. It is also a journey of continuous improvement, in which ongoing monitoring and measurement is fed back into increasingly efficient revenue generation and growth.

RPM is a strategy that optimizes interactions with buyers across the revenue cycle to accelerate predictable revenue growth. It’s a transformative process that aligns and unites marketing and sales, instead of allowing silos and dysfunction to get in the way of bottom line growth.

There’s a familiar adage that goes, “The hardest part of any journey is taking the first step,” and it certainly applies here. Because RPM directly affects so many deeply entrenched elements of a company’s organization and culture, including changes in people’s job descriptions, the journey’s beginning can seem scary and may often encounter resistance.

There are numerous aspects of a successful RPM launch, all of which are intertwined, including leadership, organizational alignment, technology, and initial project scope. Since nothing happens without leadership, that’s a good place to start.



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